Energy Saving Tips You May Not Have Thought About

energy savings light bulb with a leaf inside

The rapid change of climate brings its inconveniences. We notice them the most in the summer months when it seems there’s no air to breathe, only steam and fire. Gladly, there’s air conditioning and dehumidifying tech that saves us. But it doesn’t save our finances.

That being said, you don’t have to freeze or boil to achieve considerable electricity savings, working hard on your power of will not to switch the A/C on. There are easier, more convenient ways.

Maintain Your A/C Regularly

Maintenance shouldn’t be performed only to make appliances work for a longer time. First of all, the efficiency of their operation depends on how good their condition is. Call a technician every now and then to look at your A/C and update/upgrade its parts.

And don’t forget to check the air filter with every maintenance session. This part alone can save you up to 15% of the power the A/C is using to heat or cool the room. A dirty filter slows the capacity of the appliance, thus increasing electricity bills.

Seal Your House (Works for Summer Too)

Sealing your house isn’t only effective for the cold months. Cool air also tends to escape through the same pathways as the warm air in winter. Seal your home, and you’ll need much less heating or cooling.

Aside from the main living part of the house, make sure to check the attic and basement. Most of the time, the most dramatic leaks occur there.

This will allow for considerable electricity savings throughout the year, which you should aim for.

Change Regular Bulbs to LED Ones

LED lights are the deciding factor when it comes to cutting electricity costs. They use 75% less energy than regular bulbs and last 25+ times longer. There are savings all around if you’re opting for LEDs.

Did you know that common incandescent bulbs only use 15% of the power to light your house? And do you know where the other 85% are going? Almost all of that power goes into heat. As a result, you can’t cool the room down without excess energy use, and you waste a lot on the actual lighting. LEDs solve all those issues.

Unplug Everything You Don’t Use

When not in use, every appliance has to be not only turned off but unplugged. Each one generates just a little bit of heat when plugged in. While a single charger won’t heat the house much, when you add up everything that’s been in use, you’ll see a difference in several degrees.

Buy a Smart Thermostat

Smart tech can save you a lot of money. A smart thermostat will make it easier to manage the temperature at home, automatically adjusting settings when needed. As local governments encourage installing such technology, you can find lots of options for sale, which will save you even more.

Use every appliance wisely, keep in mind the heat they are producing. Switch everything off when you leave home and change regular technology for smart, LED, etc. At the end of the day, you’ll have electricity costs cut without lots of effort while living a comfortable life in the microclimate you find the most suitable for you and your family.

Top 7 Tips to keep your home generator ready when you need it

Not many people remember to maintain their home generator.  As a result the home generator may not work when needed because it was not properly maintained.  Like any other appliance, your home genrator must be checked frequently and repaired when needed.

We all think it’s not going to happen to us. However, even the most stable areas have power outages. And the next one may be just when you need electricity the most. The best solution? A working home generator.

But how you maintain one properly? Below are 7 great recommendations on the topic.

1. Test Your Generator Regularly

Even when you don’t need it, test the appliance. This should become a routine check to see if there are any areas that need more attention in further maintenance or repair. There’s also a feature in many generators to self-test. If you don’t know whether yours does that, call a technician and ask about it.

2. After Use, Check Oil Levels

After every test and actual use, check if the oil levels are alright. Most modern models don’t use much of it, but it’s still easy to forget to refill. Plus, there may be leaks that need to be fixed for your safety and the proper operation of the appliance.

3.  Enusre that the housing does not block ventilation

Protective housing is important for any generator. However, it doesn’t have to block the air supply or any other part. This may break the appliance or make it operate poorly. Plus, if you want additional coverage to block noise or for another reason, make sure to call an expert and consult with them first.

4. Have Additional Fuel on Hand

Many generators use natural gas to operate, but if your house doesn’t have this kind of fuel, make sure there’s enough gasoline, diesel, etc. to last for a lengthy power outage. In case of a natural disaster, you never know how long electricity will be out.

5. Check the Electrical System Regularly

It’s also important to check how the generator starts to work when an outage occurs. It should be on the automatic mode, when it starts to operate at the moment the main power source turns off.

However, issues may occur that will make the generator work dangerous. If you don’t know how to check the electrical system yourself, it’s better to contact a specialist.

6. Check the Air Filter

You should clean, fix, and/or replace the filter when needed. Make sure there’s a replacement by hand at any moment. If the filter is neglected, the generator may get damaged, which is dangerous for your house.

7. Test Smart Features Frequently

If you have a generator with smart features like smartphone operation, check whether they work regularly. This includes updating applications in time, connecting to the appliance every now and then to test settings, etc.

Check every element and feature of your home generator to make sure that in case of emergency, you’re fully covered. The climate is changing, which gives way to unusual natural disasters in areas where there wasn’t a hurricane in years.